Chochin in “Hibiscus”Chochin in “Yuki”Chochin in “Goji”Chochin in “Hibiscus” detailChochin in “Yuki” detailChochin in “Goji” detailPhoto Credit: Thomas Loof for RealSimple.com

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Chochin

$6.00$195.00

Inspired by the otherworldly chōchin-obake. A chōchin-obake(‘paper lantern ghost’) is a type of Japanese artifact spirit (known as tsukumogami) that is said to come to life and have awareness at its 100th year of existence.

Though many items have been said to become tsukumogami on their hundredth birthday,  lanterns are one of the more popular spirit manifestations.

These supernatural beings are generally considered harmless and playful, though they have been known to rise up against individuals who callously dispose of or mistreat them.

There are still certain jinja ceremonies performed today to comfort and express sympathy towards such aged or cast off items.

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Product Description

18″ repeat, straight-across match

Roll: 27″ wide x 5 yards long

Print: 27″ wide x 36″ long (ideal for framing)

Sample: 9″ wide x 11″ long

Grow House Grow’s wallpaper is hand silk screened with care in beautiful New York. Rolls come untrimmed and unpasted, and are both gently wipeable and strippable. There is a two roll minimum for all orders. Please allow three to five weeks for your wallpaper to ship. Professional installation is highly recommended.

Need help determining how much wallpaper to order?  Visit our FAQ for helpful hints and install pointers.

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Story Resources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chochinobake

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsukumogami

Additional Information

About Timeline

Heraclitus of Ephesus once stated, “The only constant is change.” How true that is. Time is a wild, foreign thing to truly wrap your head around. As a kid, it seems so simple: the clock tells you what hour is it, days are strung into endless cycles of light and dark, and it feels like you’ll never grow up. Some theorize that because of the abundance of novel experiences in our early years, we tend to remember more. These impressions, in turn, create the perception of longer and fuller days. Adults, on the other hand, have a tendency to slide into repetitive grinds with fewer new experiences from day to day. This can make us feel like time is flying by, each year faster than the last. Both stages are based wholly on perception; will our life be long or short? Is this based on the actual culmination of seconds, or on our memory of moments? Does it even matter? Before we fly off into an existential abyss, let’s take a moment to enjoy something new–Grow House Grow’s Time Line Collection. Each pattern is inspired by an element of–you guessed it–time.